Heaven Can Wait


Heaven Can Wait at KinoKino
Installation view, "This Must Be the Place: Pick Me Up and Turn Me Round," KinoKino, Sandnes, Norway, 2013. Photo by Line Bøhmer Løkken.
Heaven Can Wait at KinoKino
Installation view, "This Must Be the Place: Pick Me Up and Turn Me Round," KinoKino, Sandnes, Norway, 2013. Photo by Line Bøhmer Løkken.
Heaven Can Wait at KinoKino
Installation view, "This Must Be the Place: Pick Me Up and Turn Me Round," KinoKino, Sandnes, Norway, 2013. Photo by Line Bøhmer Løkken.
Heaven Can Wait at KinoKino
Installation view, "This Must Be the Place: Pick Me Up and Turn Me Round," KinoKino, Sandnes, Norway, 2013. Photo by Bull.Miletic.
Heaven Can Wait at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco
Installation view, "Dark Matters: Artists See the Impossible," Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, USA, 2007. Photo by George Westcot.
Heaven Can Wait at Gallery Paule Anglim, San Francisco
Installation view, "Bull.Miletic: Heaven Can Wait," Gallery Paule Anglim, San Francisco, USA, 2007. Photo by Bull.Miletic.
  • 2001-ongoing
  • Heaven Can Wait has neither a defined form nor duration, it is exhibited in accordance with the context/venue.

"Once a world's fair folly, the revolving restaurant took over the country and then the world, becoming a gently turning symbol of optimism and progress."

The key focus of this work can be broadly defined as an investigation into the ongoing cinematification of everyday life. By tracing the revolving restaurant’s cine-dream and panoramic desire through a genealogy of the moving and projected image, the Heaven Can Wait project proposes the 360-degree revolving view as “readymade cinema” or what we call cinéma trouvé—a specific cinematic experience outside the normative cinematic apparatus

In this ongoing project the revolving restaurant is treated as an optical device, where the attributes of an elevated view and mechanical motion evoke a unique cinematic experience. In the on-going process of documenting the 360-degree “moving” views from the growing number of revolving restaurants around the world, we have studied this unique architectural phenomenon through video, photography and text since 2001. Specifically designed for our exhibition at KinoKino Art, 24 slowly revolving projections display a selection of 24 views in their original speed and direction, periodically overlapping and dissolving, forging a dynamic assemblage of natural and urban landscapes.

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